Apr
1
3:00 pm15:00

Eigenanatomy (Chad Rogers)

  • Psychology Building, Danforth Campus

Psychology Building, Danforth campus Room 215

Introduction to Eigenanatomy, data reduction for 3D data similar to PCA/ICA

Mar
18
3:00 pm15:00

NO IIG

No IIG today! Note change from original schedule. Our usual room is occupied.

Feb
5
3:00 pm15:00

Orthogonalization of regressors in fMRI models (Danforth campus)

  • Psychology Building, Danforth Campus

Psychology Building, Danforth campus Room 412

I (Jonathan) will be discussing:

Mumford JA, Poline J-B, Poldrack RA (2015) Orthogonalization of regressors in fMRI models. PLoS One 10:e0126255. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0126255

 

If you'd like to go over to the psych building together, I will be leaving my office promptly at 2:30 and we can go together. (My office is McMillan 804C.) We'll take the metro to the Skinker stop and walk 1/2 mile to the psychology building.

Dec
4
2:00 pm14:00

Scanning children, and research project: Ashley Nielsen

Ashley will talk to us about scanning children, and about one of her specific research projects:

Using task demand to further illuminate group differences in the neural strategy to accomplish a task: do children and adults accomplish single word comprehension in different ways?
 
Relevant papers:


Church, Jessica A., Steven E. Petersen, and Bradley L. Schlaggar. "The “Task B problem” and other considerations in developmental functional neuroimaging." Human brain mapping 31.6 (2010): 852-862. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hbm.21036/full


 
Krishnan, Saloni, et al. "Convergent and divergent fMRI responses in children and adults to increasing language production demands." Cerebral Cortex(2014): bhu120. 

http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/content/25/10/3261

 

Nov
20
2:00 pm14:00

Everything you wanted to know about motion in fMRI (Ben Seitzman)

Relevant papers, though not required reading:

Power JD, et al. (2014). Methods to detect, characterize, adn remove motion artifact in resting state fMRI. NeuroImage 84:320-341.

Siegel JS, et al. (2014). Statistical improvements in functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses produced by censoring high-motion data points. Human Brain Mapping 35:1981-1996.

Nov
13
2:00 pm14:00

Rapid-fire presentations Part II

5 minute presentations from folks in IIG about their current work. Please keep it to 5 minutes or less, probably only 2-3 slides. It's better for everyone to understand what you're talking about than to explain the WHOLE STORY of your research project.

Oct
30
2:00 pm14:00

Rapid-fire presentations Part I

5 minute presentations from folks in IIG about their current work. Please keep it to 5 minutes or less, probably only 2-3 slides. It's better for everyone to understand what you're talking about than to explain the WHOLE STORY of your research project.

May
14
2:00 pm14:00

Hypercapnia and perhaps other normalization approaches for BOLD data (Jonathan)

Discussion of hypercapnia (breath holding) and other ways to potentially adjust the BOLD signal:

Bandettini PA, Wong EC (1997) A hypercapnia-based normalization method for improved spatial localization of human brain activation with fMRI. NMR Biomed 10:197-203.

Thomason ME, Foland LC, Glover GH (2007) Calibration of BOLD fMRI using breath holding reduces group variance during a cognitive task. Hum Brain Mapp 28:59-68.

 

Apr
9
2:00 pm14:00

Introduction to representational similarity analysis (RSA) (Jonathan)

Introduction to RSA from Kriegeskorte et al., assuming no background with MVPA. First half whiteboard, second half this paper:

Mur M, Meys M, Bodurka J, Goebel R, Bandettini PA, Kriegeskorte N (2013) Human object-similarity judgments reflect and transcent the primate-IT object representation. Frontiers in Psychol 4:128.

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00128/abstract

 

Mar
26
2:00 pm14:00

Paper discussions: How variable is the hemodynamic response?

  • 63110

Most task-based functional MRI analyses assume something approaching a "standard" or "canonical" hemodynamic response function (HRF). But how consistent is the hemodynamic response really? Does it change in aging? We'll have an informal discussion of two early and influential articles on the topic:

Aguirre GK, Zarahn E, D'Esposito M (1998) The variability of human, BOLD hemodynamic responses. NeuroImage 8:360-369. http://cl.ly/aMmI

D'Esposito M, Zarahn E, Aguirre GK, Rypma B (1999) The effect of normal aging on the coupling of neural activity to the bold hemodynamic response. NeuroImage 10:6-14. http://cl.ly/aLpx

Mar
12
2:00 pm14:00

Paper discussions on McGonigle data: How replicable is fMRI? (Jonathan)

In a well-known investigation of session-to-session variability, McGonigle et al. published a data set in which a single subject participated in 99 imaging sessions (33 repeats of simple finger tapping, checkerboard viewing, or counting). These two papers present different views on how the results might be interpreted.

 

McGonigle DJ, Howseman AM, Athwal BS, Friston KJ, Frackowiak RSJ, Holmes AP (2000) Variability in fMRI: An examination of intersession differences. NeuroImage 11:708-734.

Smith SM, Beckmann CF, Ramnani N, Woolrich MW, Bannister PR, Jenkinson M, Matthews PM, McGonigle DJ (2005) Variability in fMRI: A re-examination of inter-session differences. Hum Brain Mapp 24:248-257.